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Air Quality Guides

2017 Air Emissions Guide for USAF Transitory Sources

Superseded by Air Emissions Guide for USAF Transitory Sources - Aug 2018

The Air Emissions Guide to USAF Transitory Sources (Transitory Source Guide) provides recommended methodologies and emission factors for calculating actual emissions for the most common types of transitory sources found at USAF installations. Transitory sources are non-routine and/or seasonal sources (may be stationary, mobile or neither) that are short-term in nature. Transitory sources include: bulk storage tank cleaning, seasonal equipment, fuel spills, hot mix asphalt plants, prescribed burning, wild fires, all sources associated with construction, and all sources associated with site restoration/remediation. While historically transitory sources have often been erroneously included in stationary or mobile source air emission inventories, transitory source emissions should generally only be accounted for in evaluating potential air quality impacts of proposed action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), General Conformity, etc. The pollutants addressed in the guide include criteria pollutants, hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The September 2017 guide is the most current version of the Transitory Source Guide; all other versions are superseded and considered obsolete.

2017 Air Emissions Guide for USAF Mobile Sources

Superseded by Air Emissions Guide for USAF Mobile Sources - Aug 2018

The Air Emissions Guide to USAF Mobile Sources (Mobile Source Guide) provides recommended methodologies and emission factors for calculating actual emissions for the most common types of mobile sources found at USAF installations, including aerospace ground equipment (AGE), aircraft flying operations, on-road vehicles, and non-road vehicles/equipment. The pollutants addressed in the guide include criteria pollutants, hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The September 2017 guide is the most current version of the Source Guide; all other versions are superseded and considered obsolete.

2017 Air Emissions Guide for USAF Stationary Sources

Superseded by Air Emissions Guide for USAF Stationary Sources - Aug 2018

The Air Emissions Guide to USAF Stationary Sources (Stationary Source Guide) provides recommended methodologies and emission factors for calculating actual emissions for the most common types of stationary sources found at USAF installations. The pollutants addressed in the guide include criteria pollutants, hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The September 2017 guide is the most current version of the Stationary Source Guide; all other versions are superseded and considered obsolete.

USAF Air Quality Environmental Impact Analysis Process (EIAP) Guide - Advanced Assessments, Volume 2 of 2 - March 2016

Superseded by USAF Air Quality Environmental Impact Analysis Process (EIAP) Guide - Advanced Assessments, Volume 2 of 2 - August 2018

This guide is a continuation of the USAF Air Quality EIAP Guide and provides comprehensive instructions for performing a Level III, Advanced Air Quality Assessment. The guide provides comprehensive instructions for performing Levels III air quality EIAP assessments, and is intended to assist Air Quality Program Managers and/or Environmental Specialists in assessing advanced air quality impacts, if needed, of the USAF proposed actions. It provides guidance, procedures, and methodologies for use in carrying out an advanced quantitative and qualitative air quality EIAP assessment (which includes General Conformity Determinations).

USAF National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Area Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers Guide - Jan 2016

Superseded by USAF National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Area Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers Guide - Aug 2018

The purpose of the USAF Guide for boilers located at Area Sources of Hazardous Air Pollutants is to provide certain Air Force personnel (technicians, boiler operators, etc.) with a general understanding of key requirements for complying with 40 CFR 63 Subpart JJJJJJ, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Area Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers (commonly referred to as Subpart JJJJJJ). Subpart JJJJJJ applies to boilers located at commercial, industrial, and institutional Area Source facilities that burn coal, oil, biomass, or other solid and liquid non-waste materials. An "Area Source" HAP facility emits less than 10 tons per year of any single air toxic and less than 25 tons per year of any combination of air toxics.

USAF Compliance Guide to Stationary Internal Combustion Engines - August 2018

Superseded by USAF Compliance Guide to Stationary Internal Combustion Engines - Aug 2019

The purpose of the United States Air Force (USAF) Stationary Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) Guide is to provide certain Air Force personnel (generator operators, Air Program Managers, etc.) with a general understanding of key requirements for complying with three interrelated stationary ICE air emission rules: National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart ZZZZ), New Source Performance Standards for Stationary Compression Ignition (40 CFR Part 60, Subpart IIII), and New Source Performance Standards for Stationary Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engines (40 CFR 60, Subpart JJJJ). The USAF frequently uses stationary (e.g., remains in one location for more than 12 consecutive months) ICE to power equipment necessary to provide essential services (e.g., medical care, fire suppression) and critical mission support (e.g., flight line operations, communications).

USAF Compliance Guide to Stationary Internal Combustion Engines - July 2017

Superseded by USAF Compliance Guide to Stationary Internal Combustion Engines - Aug 2018

The purpose of the United States Air Force (USAF) Stationary Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) Guide is to provide certain Air Force personnel (generator operators, Air Program Managers, etc.) with a general understanding of key requirements for complying with three interrelated stationary ICE air emission rules: National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart ZZZZ), New Source Performance Standards for Stationary Compression Ignition (40 CFR Part 60, Subpart IIII), and New Source Performance Standards for Stationary Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engines (40 CFR 60, Subpart JJJJ). The USAF frequently uses stationary (e.g., remains in one location for more than 12 consecutive months) ICE to power equipment necessary to provide essential services (e.g., medical care, fire suppression) and critical mission support (e.g., flight line operations, communications).

USAF National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers Guide - Jan 2016

Superseded by USAF National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers Guide - Aug 2018

The purpose of the USAF Guide for boilers located at Area Sources of Hazardous Air Pollutants is to provide certain Air Force personnel (technicians, boiler operators, etc.) with a general understanding of key requirements for complying with 40 CFR 63 Subpart DDDDD, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers (commonly referred to as Subpart DDDDD or Boiler MACT). A "Major Area Source" HAP facility emits 10 tons per year or more of any single air toxic and less than 25 tons or more per year of any combination of air toxics.

2016 Air Emissions Guide for USAF Stationary Sources

Superseded by 2017 Air Emissions Guide to USAF Stationary Sources

The Air Emissions Guide to USAF Stationary Sources (Stationary Source Guide) provides recommended methodologies and emission factors for calculating actual emissions for the most common types of stationary sources found at USAF installations.The pollutants addressed in the guide include criteria pollutants, hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The July 2016 guide is the most current version of the Stationary Source Guide; all other versions are superseded and considered obsolete.

2014 Air Emissions Guide to USAF Stationary Sources with Dec 2015 Addendum

Superseded by 2016 Air Emissions Guide to USAF Stationary Sources

The Air Emissions Guide to USAF Stationary Sources (Stationary Source Guide) provides recommended methodologies and emission factors for calculating actual emissions for the most common types of stationary sources found at USAF installations.The pollutants addressed in the guide include criteria pollutants, hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The October 2014 guide is the most current version of the Stationary Source Guide; all other versions are superseded and considered obsolete.

Air Emissions Guide to Air Force Stationary Sources - October 2014

Superseded by 2014 Air Emissions Guide to Air Force Stationary Sources with Dec 2015 Addendum

The Air Emissions Guide to Air Force Stationary Sources (Stationary Source Guide) provides recommended methodologies and emission factors for calculating actual emissions for the most common types of stationary sources found at Air Force installations.The pollutants addressed in the guide include criteria pollutants, hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The October 2014 guide is the most current version of the Stationary Source Guide; all other versions are superseded and considered obsolete.

Corrections Addendum to the October 2014 Stationary Source Emissions Guide

Merged with 2014 Air Emissions Guide to Air Force Stationary Sources with Dec 2015 Addendum

The Corrections Addendum to the October 2014 Air Emissions Guide for Air Force Stationary Sources provides updates and revisions to errors found in the newest copy of the Stationary Source Guide. This document is periodically updated as revisions are made to clarify portions of the guide or to resolve any errors encountered while reviewing the stationary guide. The corrections addendum is organized so that the issue is first defined, the resolution to the error is described, and corrective action provided.

2016 Air Emissions Guide for USAF Mobile Sources

Superseded by 2017 Air Emissions Guide to USAF Mobile Sources

The Air Emissions Guide to USAF Mobile Sources (Mobile Source Guide) provides recommended methodologies and emission factors for calculating actual emissions for the most common types of mobile sources found at USAF installations, including aerospace ground equipment (AGE), aircraft flying operations, on-road vehicles, and non-road vehicles/equipment. The pollutants addressed in the guide include criteria pollutants, hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The July 2016 guide is the most current version of the Source Guide; all other versions are superseded and considered obsolete.

2014 Air Emissions Guide to USAF Mobile Sources with Dec 2015 Addendum

Superseded by 2016 Air Emissions Guide to USAF Mobile Sources

The Air Emissions Guide to USAF Mobile Sources (Mobile Source Guide) provides recommended methodologies and emission factors for calculating actual emissions for the most common types of mobile sources found at USAF installations, including aerospace ground equipment (AGE), aircraft flying operations, on-road vehicles, and non-road vehicles/equipment. The pollutants addressed in the guide include criteria pollutants, hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The October 2014 guide is the most current version of the Mobile Source Guide; all other versions are superseded and considered obsolete.

Air Emissions Guide to Air Force Mobile Sources - October 2014

Superseded by 2014 Air Emissions Guide to Air Force Mobile Sources with Dec 2015 Addendum

The Air Emissions Guide to Air Force Mobile Sources (Mobile Source Guide) provides recommended methodologies and emission factors for calculating actual emissions for the most common types of mobile sources found at Air Force installations, including aerospace ground equipment (AGE), aircraft flying operations, on-road vehicles, and non-road vehicles/equipment. The pollutants addressed in the guide include criteria pollutants, hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The October 2014 guide is the most current version of the Mobile Source Guide; all other versions are superseded and considered obsolete.

Corrections Addendum to the October 2014 Mobile Source Emissions Guide

Merged with 2014 Air Emissions Guide to Air Force Mobile Sources with Dec 2015 Addendum

The Air Emissions Guide to Air Force Mobile Sources (Mobile Source Guide) provides recommended methodologies and emission factors for calculating actual emissions for the most common types of mobile sources found at Air Force installations, including aerospace ground equipment (AGE), aircraft flying operations, on-road vehicles, and non-road vehicles/equipment. The pollutants addressed in the guide include criteria pollutants, hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The October 2014 guide is the most current version of the Mobile Source Guide; all other versions are superseded and considered obsolete.

Air Emissions Guide for Air Force Mobile Sources - August 2013

Superseded by Air Emissions Guide to Air Force Mobile Sources - October 2014

The Air Emissions Guide provides recommended methodologies and emission factors for calculating actual emissions for the most common types of mobile sources found at Air Force installations, including aerospace ground equipment (AGE), aircraft flying operations, on-road vehicles, and non-road vehicles/equipment. The pollutants addressed in the guide include both criteria pollutants and hazardous air pollutants (HAP's).

2016 Air Emissions Guide for USAF Transitory Sources

Superseded by 2017 Air Emissions Guide for USAF Transitory Sources

The Air Emissions Guide to USAF Transitory Sources (Transitory Source Guide) provides recommended methodologies and emission factors for calculating actual emissions for the most common types of transitory sources found at USAF installations. Transitory sources are non-routine and/or seasonal sources (may be stationary, mobile or neither) that are short-term in nature. Transitory sources include: bulk storage tank cleaning, seasonal equipment, fuel spills, hot mix asphalt plants, prescribed burning, wild fires, all sources associated with construction, and all sources associated with site restoration/remediation. While historically transitory sources have often been erroneously included in stationary or mobile source air emission inventories, transitory source emissions should generally only be accounted for in evaluating potential air quality impacts of proposed action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), General Conformity, etc. The pollutants addressed in the guide include criteria pollutants, hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The July 2016 guide is the most current version of the Transitory Source Guide; all other versions are superseded and considered obsolete.

2016 Air Emissions Guide for Air Force Transitory Sources

Superseded by 2016 Air Emissions Guide for USAF Transitory Sources

The Air Emissions Guide to USAF Transitory Sources (Transitory Source Guide) provides recommended methodologies and emission factors for calculating actual emissions for the most common types of transitory sources found at USAF installations. Transitory sources are non-routine and/or seasonal sources (may be stationary, mobile or neither) that are short-term in nature. Transitory sources include: bulk storage tank cleaning, seasonal equipment, fuel spills, hot mix asphalt plants, prescribed burning, wild fires, all sources associated with construction, and all sources associated with site restoration/remediation. While historically transitory sources have often been erroneously included in stationary or mobile source air emission inventories, transitory source emissions should generally only be accounted for in evaluating potential air quality impacts of proposed action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), General Conformity, etc. The pollutants addressed in the guide include criteria pollutants, hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), and greenhouse gases (GHGs).

USAF Air Quality Environmental Impact Analysis Process (EIAP) Guide, Volume I - October 2014

Superseded by USAF Air Quality Environmental Impact Analysis Process (EIAP) Guide - Fundamentals, Volume 1 of 2 - August 2016

The Air Quality EIAP Guide provides comprehensive instructions for assessing air quality impacts associated with USAF proposed action. The guide supplement 32 CFR 989, Environmental Impact Analysis Process, with guidance, procedures, and methodologies for meeting the air quality-specific requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Council on Environmental Quality�s (CEQ�s) Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508). Additionally, the guide incorporates compliance requirements for 40 CFR 93 Subpart B, Determining Conformity of General Federal Actions to State or Federal Implementation Plans, and supersedes the USAF Conformity Guide (2010).

USAF Air Conformity Guide - August 2010

Superseded by Air Force Air Quality Environmental Impact Analysis Process (EIAP) Guide - October 2014

The Conformity Guide assists in understanding and complying with the general conformity requirements of the Clean Air Act (CAA). Additionally, the Guide discusses conformity as it relates to the Environmental Impact Analysis Process/National Environmental Policy Act (EIAP/NEPA), CAA Title V operating permits, and Base Closure and Realignment (BRAC).

USAF Guide to the Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule and Greenhouse Gas Tailoring Rule - May 2018

Superseded by USAF Guide to the Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule and Greenhouse Gas Tailoring Rule - May 2019

The United States Air Force Guide to the Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting and Tailoring Rules discusses the applicability, requirements, and calculation methodologies for each rule as it pertains to the USAF. The first part of the Guide covers the Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule (MGHGRR) which requires large emitters of greenhouse gases (GHG) to collect GHG emissions data under a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reporting system. The second part of the Guide covers the "Tailoring Rule" which incorporates GHG emissions into the existing Title V and Prevention of Significant Deterioration ("PSD") permitting requirements. The Tailoring Rule regulates the same pollutants that are subject to reporting under the MGHGRR. While the court invalidated a portion of the Tailoring Rule, it held up EPA's ability to regulate GHG emissions for facilities already regulated for other pollutants under the PSD permit.

USAF Guide to the Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule and Greenhouse Gas Tailoring Rule - May 2017

Superseded by USAF Guide to the Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule and Greenhouse Gas Tailoring Rule - May 2018

This guide provides a quick overview of Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule [40 CFR 98; aka Mandatory Reporting Rule, (MRR)] requirements of interest and relevance to the United States Air Force's facilities. The guide addresses main issues of specific concern to the USAF, which include: the definition of facility (which provides for segmenting for military); who must report (in simple terms); deriving max heat capacity input for internal combustion engines, aircraft engines, and aircraft engines testing; explains what sources need to be reported; GHG estimating; report, and specific exit strategies.

USAF Guide to the Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule - March 2016

Superseded by USAF Guide to the Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule and Greenhouse Gas Tailoring Rule - May 2017

The United States Air Force Guide to the Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule addresses the applicability, requirements, calculation methodologies, and exit strategies of the Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule, also known as the Mandatory Reporting Rule, as it pertains to the Air Force. The Mandatory Reporting Rule (MRR) is an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-led endeavor to gather information about greenhouse gases (GHGs). The objective is to determine which greenhouse gases are being emitted, how much of those greenhouse gases are being emitted, and from which industry sectors those greenhouse gases are being emitted.

USAF Quick Guide to the Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule - March 2015

Superseded by USAF Guide to the Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule - March 2016

This guide provides a quick overview of Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule [40 CFR 98; aka Mandatory Reporting Rule, (MRR)] requirements of interest and relevance to the United States Air Force's facilities. The guide addresses main issues of specific concern to the USAF, which include: the definition of facility (which provides for segmenting for military); who must report (in simple terms); deriving max heat capacity input for internal combustion engines, aircraft engines, and aircraft engines testing; explains what sources need to be reported; GHG estimating; report, and specific exit strategies.

Air Quality Playbook

Air Quality Playbook - 2010

The first GHG Tailoring Rule Fact Sheet (May 13, 2010) summarizes the EPA�s Final Rule for Step 1 and Step 2; phasing in the GHG emission thresholds, applicability, and requirements.

Air Quality Playbook Management Flowchart

The Air Quality Management Flow Chart is a diagram designed to navigate the user through the management, decision making process, and responsibilities involved in an installation-level air quality program.